8 Best Places to Work in as a Freelancer That’s Not Starbucks

If you’re a freelancer, then chances are, you you’ve already tried working in a Starbucks near your place. It’s not hard to see why—after all they’ve got palatable food, good coffee, and air conditioning, and the seats there are also quite comfortable to be working in. There’s also the fact that the chatter around you is usually low-key enough that it doesn’t distract you from your work. Moreover, Starbucks also offers free Wi-Fi to its customers, something that can definitely help you with your freelance assignments. You might even take advantage of this if you need to browse through job sites to find freelance work in the Philippines.

But what if you’ve been working inside a Starbucks for the longest time, and the usual crowd is starting to get distracting? What if some of the staff or customers there are starting to give you the stink eye for hogging a seat and a table for hours on end? Well, the great thing about being a freelancer is that you can easily just switch locations to give yourself a change of pace and break the monotony. Here are some great ideas on where else you can do your freelance work.

Your home

Besides your favorite coffee shop, your home may be the first ever place you’d think to work remotely from. In fact, it probably worked out well until you realized that you needed to get out of the house to actually focus on your work, as there’s just too many distractions within reach. But what if you created a space in your home that serves as an office instead? Just clean out a room of all distracting elements, ensure that it’s well-lit and ventilated, put a desk and chair in it, and consider that as your home office. Close the door behind you and tell your family not to bother you when you’re working inside so that you can focus.

The city library

Does your city have a library nearby? If so, then that’s another place you can do freelance work in. City libraries are quiet, well-lit, and have comfortable air conditioning. They also usually offer free Wi-Fi as well, or have computer kiosks that you can browse the web from for free. The only downside is you may have to deal with an influx of noisy schoolchildren every now and then, but chances are, they’ll get hushed by the librarian soon enough.

A mall food court

A mall food court can also be a feasible place to work in as well, provided that you don’t mind the myriad smells of food being prepared all around you, as well as the noise of chattering customers everywhere. What’s more, you may find your table and chair occupied when you leave for a bathroom break. At the very least, you won’t have to go far to get a good, warm meal, and the variety is exciting.

A co-working space

A co-working space is essentially an office that allows you to rent out a table to work at for a set amount of time, or even an entire day. These “shared offices” usually offer a lot of amenities that make it easy to work in, such as air conditioning, free Wi-Fi Internet, and perhaps even free-flowing coffee or tea. Do be warned that some of them may be expensive, but they’re certainly an option to consider, especially if you want to work in an office-like setting, but without all the negatives of an actual office.

A university’s common area

If there’s a university nearby and it’s got a common area that you can freely visit, then you may want to consider doing your freelance work there. University common areas are usually great for getting some work done, but like with libraries, you may have to deal with noisy students every now and then. Skip this if you’re the type to be easily bothered by loud conversations.

A park

A park is a wonderful place to work remotely from. You’ve got fresh air, sunshine, grassy scenery, and the gentle sounds of the city all around you while you work. That being said, you may find it challenging to work in a park for long periods of time, especially if it’s too hot or too cold out, or if it’s a rainy day. What’s more, a park is an open and public place, so you may run into some unsavory folk who may have their eyes on your laptop or belongings if you’re not careful. If you must work at a park, make sure to leave well before it gets dark.

A fast food restaurant

Who hasn’t spent a couple of hours (or maybe more) at a McDonald’s to study in one of its comfy booths? All while enjoying a small order of fries or a regular coke float every now and then to keep the staff happy, of course. If you’re alright with the usual noises and smells of a fast food restaurant, then you can probably try working remotely in one for a change of pace. Just make sure not to be too obvious about what you’re doing, as the staff may politely try to make you leave if they figure out that you’re occupying an entire booth or table just to work.

A bar

A bar is just like a Starbucks, but instead of coffee, you’re going to have to buy alcohol. Not really that ideal if you’re a light drinker, but you may find yourself being a lot more creative after a few sips. Just make sure to choose the non-smoking area, otherwise you may find your laptop (and your clothes) smelling of smoke every time you come home.

Being a freelancer affords you the freedom of working anywhere you want to. You can exercise that freedom by trying out the different locations listed above to see which one works best for you. You don’t have to tie yourself down to your favorite Starbucks branch, unless, of course, you find yourself more productive and efficient when working there. If all else fails, you could just designate a room in your house to be your home office. It’s way cheaper, and you won’t have to buy an expensive coffee to access the Wi-Fi!